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Media Coverage

April 10, 2021
Amazon warehouse employees voted against unionization in Bessemer, Alabama, in a victory for the company and a defeat for organized labor. But even if the results hold, was this really a win for Amazon? Margaret O'Mara, professor of history at the UW, is quoted. GeekWire
April 10, 2021
Jeff Bezos surprised some Amazon critics and followers this week by throwing his weight behind a federal corporate tax hike to help pay for President Biden’s infrastructure plan. It was a position that seemed out of step with his company’s history and the rest of corporate America. Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the UW, is quoted. GeekWire
April 10, 2021
In an effort to protect the Native American community, the elders of Washington’s tribes and the state government have been forced to shut down large competitive and traditional powwows as a matter of social distancing, leaving this important emblem of Native American community, cultural visibility and in some cases, livelihood, on indefinite pause. Scott Pinkham, lecturer in American Indian studies at the UW, is quoted. South Seattle Emerald
April 9, 2021
Dan Chirot, professor of international studies, discusses the unprecidented political events of the last year. UW News
April 9, 2021
Amazon is the second largest private employer in the U.S. with nearly 800,000 workers. But none of its facilities are unionized and the push to unionize from workers in Alabama is over — for now. Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the UW, is interviewed. PBS
April 9, 2021
Amazon is the second largest private employer in the U.S. with nearly 800,000 workers. But none of its facilities are unionized and the push to unionize from workers in Alabama is over — for now. Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the UW, is interviewed. PBS
April 9, 2021
Amazon appeared to beat back the most significant labor drive in its history on Friday, when an initial tally showed that workers at its giant warehouse in Alabama had voted decisively against forming a union. Margaret O'Mara, professor of history at the UW, is quoted. The New York Times
April 8, 2021
Dr. Meredith Rawls, astronomy research scientist, discusses the issue of space debris. Engadget
April 8, 2021
Katherine Munoz-Castano, a first year student pursuing a double major in Art and Cinema + Media Studies and a recipient of the Crabby Beach foundation Art Scholarship, is interviewed about her time at the UW. School of Art + Art History + Design
April 8, 2021
Dr. Emily M. Bender, a professor of linguistics, discusses the potential effects of natural language processing technology. The Daily
April 8, 2021
Alexes Harris, Presidential Term Professor and Professor of Sociology, writes about the possibility of repaying people with now-voided drug convictions. Crosscut
April 8, 2021
Maya Angela Smith, associate professor of French and Italian studies, discusses the African American roots of the sea chantey. Zocalo Public Square
April 8, 2021
KBTC's Northwest Now examines the concept of "cancel culture": Is this a way to preserve thoughts and feelings, or is it a violation of free speech and even due process? Victor Menaldo, professor of political science at the UW, is interviewed. PBS
April 7, 2021
David Hertzog, professor of physics, explains the results of new research on muons, a type of particle. UW News
April 7, 2021
Evidence is mounting that a tiny subatomic particle called a muon is disobeying the laws of physics as we thought we knew them, scientists announced on Wednesday. David Hertzog, professor of physics at the UW, is mentioned. The New York Times
April 7, 2021
“Ever since early February, when some software volunteers debuted a website to help the public find COVID-19 vaccine appointments, they’ve had a unique window into the ebb and flow of what one engineer there dubbed ‘the spice.’ Who wants the vaccines, and who doesn’t? Where in the state are the shots snapped right up, and where are they left wanting?” writes columnist Danny Westneat. Jessica Chong, assistant professor of pediatrics in the UW School of Medicine, and Carl Bergstrom, professor of biology at the UW, are quoted. The Seattle Times
April 7, 2021
Gigi Costello-Montgomery, an Art major, discusses her unique pathway at the UW. School of Art + Art History + Design
April 7, 2021
A 6-mile-wide space rock and colossal eruptions racked Earth at the same fateful moment. Scientists have tried for decades to determine the primary suspect behind the Cretaceous extinction. Gregory Wilson Mantilla, Burke Museum curator of vertebrate paleontology and professor of biology at the UW, is quoted. Discover Magazine
April 7, 2021
Jazz is a music based on improvisation, and evolution. Moving through Dixieland, swing, bebop, free jazz, fusion and beyond can make describing what jazz is a difficult proposition. Michael Brockman, the co-artistic director of Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra and an artist in residence at the UW School of Music, is interviewed. KNKX
April 7, 2021
Particles called muons are behaving weirdly and it could mean a huge discovery. David Hertzog, professor of physics at the UW, is interviewed on the “60-Second Science” podcast. Scientific American
April 6, 2021
Students across western Washington are returning to the classroom this month. After a year of isolation, mental health experts say some students may be struggling with the idea of heading back to school. Jane Simoni, professor of psychology at the UW, is interviewed. King 5 News
April 6, 2021
The term “herd immunity” has been thrown around frequently as vaccinations in the United States have ramped up, with many viewing it as the end goal for the COVID-19 pandemic. But as Carl Bergstrom, professor of biology at the UW, detailed in a thread posted to Twitter, it may not be that simple. MyNorthwest
April 6, 2021
Shannon Dorsey, professor of child clinical psychology, explains how students can adjust to in-person learning. UW News
April 6, 2021
Some people are born to spend or to save. It may actually just be in your genes. With an interest in individual investor behavior, Stephan Siegel, professor of finance and business economics at the University of Washington, set out to understand how people develop their financial habits. CNBC
April 5, 2021
"STAR CLUB REDEMPTION BOOTH," a new installation at the Henry Art Gallery poses questions of "human vulnerability, and the things we turn to to make sense of an uncertain world." The Daily

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