• The maximum human life span will likely increase this century, but not by more than a decade

    "When Jeanne Calment of France died in 1997 at the age of 122 years and 164 days, she set a record for oldest human. That record still stands. As statisticians who study demography, we expect that record will be broken by 2100," write the UW's Michael Pearce, a doctoral student in statistics, and Adrian Raftery, professor of statistics and of sociology.

    The Conversation
  • The Delta variant and ‘breakthrough’ infections: should Americans be worried?

    Experts say so-called breakthrough cases remain rare, and deaths among vaccinated people are "effectively zero." Adrian Raftery, professor of statistics and of sociology at the UW, is quoted.

    The Guardian
  • Up to 60% of U.S. Covid-19 Cases Unreported, Disease Model Says

    As many as 60% of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. have gone unreported, and the coronavirus has infected nearly 1 in 5 Americans, according to a new model out of the University of Washington. The UW's Nicholas Irons, a doctoral student in statistics, and Adrian Raftery, professor of statistics and of sociology, are quoted.

    Bloomberg
  • Covid cases in US may have been undercounted by 60%, study shows

    The number of COVID-19 cases across the U.S. may have been undercounted by as much as 60%, researchers at the UW have found. Adrian Raftery, professor of statistics and of sociology at the UW, is quoted.

    The Guardian
  • How Long Can Humans Really Live?

    Michael Pearce, a doctoral student in statistics at the UW, and Adrian Raftery, PhD, a professor of sociology, discuss how long humans coild live.

    Elemental
  • Opinion: Crowdfunding sites like GoFundMe fails most of those in need

    "A GoFundMe campaign is a poor — and unfair — substitute for functional social programs. The crowdfunding business, to which hundreds of thousands of people turned for help with rent and other basic needs during the pandemic, may well be a platform for 'inspiring acts of kindness,' but every donation also dictates who is being left behind," write Nora Kenworthy, associate professor of nursing and health studies at UW Bothell, and Mark Igra, a graduate student in sociology at the UW.

    Los Angeles Times
  • Dianne Harris named dean of UW College of Arts & Sciences

    University of Washington Provost Mark A. Richards today announced Dianne Harris will become dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, beginning Sept. 1.

    UW News
  • Seattle startup Truveta raises $95M for ambitious vision to aggregate data across healthcare systems

    Seattle-based health data company Truveta today announced $95 million in fresh funding and the addition of three new participating health care systems, bringing its total to 17. Tyler McCormick, associate professor of statistics and of sociology at the UW, is quoted.

    GeekWire
  • Opinion: The Trinity Bellwoods crackdown was not surprising — but there is a better way to respond to encampments

    "As researchers of policing and homelessness, we have seen an unmistakable rise in homeless sweeps and encampment crackdowns since the late 1990s. This response to visible poverty results from a collision of forces, both in Canada and the United States: the decline of affordable housing and mental-health services, and local governments’ desires to revitalize business districts, boost tourism and attract high-income residents," write Katherine Beckett, professor of sociology and of law, societies and justice at the UW, and Forrest Stuart of Stanford University.

    The Globe and Mail
  • The Inequality of the GoFundMe Economy

    Mark Igra, graduate student in sociology, explains the results of his new study on digital fund-raising equality.

    The New York Times
  • How long can a person live? The 21st century may see a record-breaker

    Michael Pearce, a UW doctoral student in statistics, and Adrian Raftery, a professor of sociology, discuss the results of their new study.

    UW News
  • Tracking Your Life

    A new sociology course explores self-tracking technology that captures our daily routines.

    July 2021 Perspectives
  • " Thousands of people turned to crowdfunding during COVID-19. For most, it didn't pan out."

    Most Americans who turned to the internet for financial help during the pandemic failed to raise much. Of the more than 175,000 GoFundMe campaigns that were started in the first half of 2020 and that cited COVID-19, 43% received no donations at all and 90% did not reach their stated goal. Nearly a quarter of all funds raised through the platform went to the top 1% of campaigns. Mark Igra, a graduate student in sociology at the UW, is quoted.

    CBS News
  • Pandemic-era crowdfunding more common, successful in affluent communities

    During the first several months of the pandemic — when communities locked down, jobs were lost, PPE was scarce and store shelves were cleared — thousands of people turned to online crowdfunding to meet their needs. But a new University of Washington analysis of requests and donations to the popular crowdfunding site GoFundMe, along with Census data, shows stark inequities in where the money went and how much was donated.

    UW News
  • Pandemic-era crowdfunding more common, successful in affluent communities

    A new UW study led by Mark Igra, a graduate student in sociology, highights inequities in GoFundMe donations.

    UW News